Hacked Websites

WordPress Vulnerability & Patch Roundup November 2022

Vulnerability reports and responsible disclosures are essential for website security awareness and education. Automated attacks targeting known software vulnerabilities are one of the leading causes of website compromises. To help educate website owners on emerging threats to their environments, we’ve compiled a list of important security updates and vulnerability patches for the WordPress ecosystem this

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New Wave of SocGholish cid=27x Injections

On November 15th, Ben Martin reported a new type of WordPress infection resulting in the injection of SocGholish scripts into web pages. The attack loads zipped malicious templates from WordPress theme and fake plugins files before extracting the SocGholish script, which is saved as an encrypted value inside the wp_option table of the WordPress database.

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How to Fix the “This Site May Harm Your Computer” Warning

Most modern web browsers and search authorities like Google have a vested interest in protecting their users from malware. Warning messages like “This site may harm your computer” are a clear way for services to educate and protect end users from accessing malicious websites. A hacked website can result in a plethora of headaches: unwanted

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New SocGholish Malware Variant Uses Zip Compression & Evasive Techniques

Readers of this blog should already be familiar with SocGholish: a widespread, years-long malware campaign aimed at pushing fake browser updates to unsuspecting web users. Once installed, fake browser updates infect the victim’s computer with various types of malware including remote access trojans (RATs). SocGholish malware is often the first step in severe targeted ransomware

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Wordfence Evasion Malware Conceals Backdoors

Malware authors, with some notable exceptions, tend to design their malicious code to hide from sight. The techniques they use help their malware stay on the victim’s website for as long as possible and ensure execution. For example — obfuscation techniques, fake code comments, naming conventions for injections that deploy SEO spam, redirect visitors to

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What is the 503 Service Unavailable Error & How to Fix It

Imagine for a moment that you’re searching for a topic. You find what you’re looking for on the first page of Google’s search results and click through to the website. But instead of the expected web page, you find yourself staring down the barrel of a 503: Service Unavailable error message. You’re going to immediately

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What is a Malware Attack?

A malware attack is the act of injecting malicious software to infiltrate and execute unauthorized commands within a victim’s system without their knowledge or authorization. The objectives of such an attack can vary – from stealing client information to sell as lead sources, obtaining system information for personal gain, bringing a site down to stop

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New Malware Variants Serve Bogus CloudFlare DDoS Captcha

When attackers shift up their campaigns, change their payload or exfiltration domains, and put some extra effort into hiding their malware it’s usually a telltale sign that they are making some money off of their exploits. One such campaign is the fake CloudFlare DDoS pages which we reported on last month. The attack is simple:

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A Guide to Virtual Patching for Website Vulnerabilities

All software has bugs — but some bugs can lead to serious security vulnerabilities that can impact your website and traffic. Vulnerabilities can be especially dangerous when your software is running over the web, since anyone can reach out and try to attack it. That’s why keeping your website up-to-date with the latest patches and

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Gambling Spam in Visual Composer Raw HTML Element: [vc_raw_html]

Bad actors often look for clever ways to boost the rankings and visibility of their spam pages in search. One of the many black hat SEO injections that we regularly find on compromised sites involves spammy links hidden inside a <div> with the following style “overflow:hidden;height:1px” that makes them invisible to a regular site visitor.

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