Lack of encryption of ePHI in transmission and at rest

Risk: Lack of encryption of ePHI in transmission and at rest

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Explanation: ePHI is vulnerable to be compromised in all the states it is in. Whether it is at rest (in databases and files), or in motion (being transmitted through networks), or in use (being updated, or read), or is disposed (discarded paper files or electronic storage media). Using encryption puts an extra layer of security to ePHI because even if someone gains access or reads ePHI, if it is encrypted then the chances of ePHI getting compromised diminishes. It makes the data unreadable and unusable by unauthorized persons. When ePHI is transmitted through networks, it is possible that it will be accessed by unauthorized persons, thus compromising ePHI. These type of unauthorized access hacking may not be immediately known, but can cause many damages.

Major Mitigation: ePHI should be encrypted and there must also be reasonable and appropriate mechanisms in place to prevent access to ePHI so that it is not accessed by persons or software programs that have not been granted access rights.

There are many different encryption methods and technologies to encrypt data in motion (SSL, VPN) or at rest. Choose the methods and technologies that best meet the physician’s office requirements.

Success Criteria: The risk analysis/assessment reports will provide a clear indication of whether these type of risks exists or has been mitigated with appropriate controls.

Auditing logs that track access to ePHI can be verified periodically to check if there has been unauthorized access by persons or software programs that have not been granted access rights.

Source: www.gpo.gov